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Log in Quiz: Are You Bored With Your COPD Exercise Routine

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Are You Bored With Your COPD Exercise Routine?
Answer each question to find out which types of activities can help you shake up the exercise regimen you use with your chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. By Jen Laskey | Medically reviewed by Rosalyn Carson-DeWitt, MD
RESULT:
Learn more about COPD management.
Last updated 5/13/2014
Have you been diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease,
or COPD?
Have you talked to your primary care physician, a pulmonologist, a respiratory therapist, or a physical therapist about the kind of exercise regimen that's right for you?
That's great, because when you have COPD, it's essential to have an expert evaluate your condition and any other factors that may affect your ability to do certain exercises. Always consult with your doctor before starting any new exercise regimen to make sure it's safe for you. Did your doctor, respiratory therapist, or physical therapist give you guidelines for exercising with COPD?
You'll need to follow the guidelines when making any changes to your exercise routine.
The basic guidelines for physical fitness for healthy Americans are 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity each week, strength training 2 to 3 times per week, and stretching exercises 3 or more days a week. However, experts at the Cleveland Clinic recommend that people with COPD gradually work up to an exercise session lasting 20 to 30 minutes, at least 3 to 4 times a week. Your own exercise regimen may need to be modified based on your COPD and other factors, so be sure to talk to your doctor before trying any new exercise.
Consulting with a medical expert is a critical step before starting any new exercise program, especially when you have COPD. Your doctor can evaluate your lifestyle, your COPD condition, and any other factors that may affect your ability to do certain physical activities, and then let you know if the new routine will be safe for you. Do you want to continue anyway?
Do you use supplemental oxygen?
Exercise is vital, even for people using supplemental oxygen. It benefits the cardiovascular system and helps the body use oxygen more efficiently. “Always exercise with your oxygen on, and use proper breathing techniques,” advises Michael Clark, BA, RRT, CPFT, from the John C. Lincoln Pulmonary Function Lab in Phoenix, Ariz. “Oxygen delivery systems are more portable and more accepted in gyms than ever before,” he says. “Long air hoses can attach to your nasal cannula so you can do most any activity, even water aerobics, and some oxygen tanks are small and light enough to carry in the basket of your bicycle.” Call your oxygen supplier to learn more about equipment that can help make exercising with
oxygen easier.
To get ideas on how to vary your COPD exercise routine, tell us how you typically prefer to exercise. Do you like to work out:
Alone
Other
Group
You'd rather exercise:
Outdoors
You'd rather work out with:
Buddy
Trainer
Therapist
Where?
Class
Outdoors
Are you concerned that you may
have COPD?
Ask your primary care physician whether you should make an appointment with a pulmonologist to discuss your concerns. Whether you have COPD or not, staying physically active to the best of your ability can help keep your body conditioned and contribute to good health without stressing your cardiopulmonary system. Do you want to continue this quiz anyway?
This quiz is geared toward people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). If you have other cardiopulmonary health concerns, discuss them with your primary care physician or a specialist in pulmonology. Remember that staying physically active to the best of your ability can help keep you healthy and strong — and doesn’t have to stress your cardiopulmonary system. Do you want to continue this quiz anyway?
Keep in mind that the basic guidelines for physical fitness for healthy Americans are 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity each week, strength training 2 to 3 times per week, and stretching exercises 3 or more days a week. But this regimen may need to be modified if you have COPD or another health condition, so be sure to talk to your doctor before trying any new exercise.
Result 21
Depending on the severity of your COPD condition, physical ability, doctor's advice, and the area where you live, you may want to consider light-endurance exercises like walking, gentle hiking, hula hooping, swimming in an outdoor pool, cross-country skiing, in-line skating, light jogging, cycling, tai chi, or a low-impact sport like golf. And always be sure to incorporate proper
breathing techniques.
If shortness of breath is a limitation to your exercise routine, go slowly and exercise for as long as you can. “A long, slow workout will help increase your stamina, and your speed will increase with practice,” says Michael Clark, BA, RRT, CPFT, from the John C. Lincoln Pulmonary Function Lab in Phoenix, Ariz. Using proper breathing techniques, like pursed-lip breathing and diaphragmatic breathing, can also help.
With any exercise program, it’s a good idea to change your activities and intensity levels to prevent any one exercise from becoming dull or failing to safely challenge your cardiopulmonary system. Remember, your body likes mixing things up; change leads to increased strength, improved conditioning, and better balance, and it makes exercise more fun.
One last word on exercising outdoors: The air quality and weather can sometimes aggravate COPD, so you may need to exercise indoors on days when air pollution is especially bad or there’s an ozone alert, or if the weather is excessively hot and humid or cold and dry.
Result 23
You can do your own doctor-approved workout at the gym. Consider swimming laps, or even walking them, in the gym pool (you can use a kickboard to make laps easier). Do low-impact walking or light jogging around the gym's track, if your doctor says it's okay. Work out on the gym's aerobic and resistance equipment. “Be sure to always pay extra attention to your breathing too,” says Gabriel Ettenson, a licensed physical therapist in Colorado. “Treadmills, elliptical machines, and stationary bikes safely challenge the cardiopulmonary system and also deal with the loss of slow-twitch muscle fibers that occurs in people with COPD.” In addition, Ettenson recommends whole-body vibration equipment. “Most gyms are providing this now,” he says, “and not only is it safe for people with COPD, but a growing amount of research suggests that it's more effective than traditional exercise programs.”
Strength training with free weights or resistance bands is another good option. People with COPD can also benefit from using an arm ergometer or the arms on an Airdyne cycle or recumbent stepper, as well as from upper-body resistance training. “There are many muscles that surround the lungs, from the shoulders to the lower back, that should be kept strong for optimal lung function,” says Michael Clark, BA, RRT, CPFT, from the John C. Lincoln Pulmonary Function Lab in Phoenix, Ariz. “Be sure to incorporate exercises that strengthen the diaphragmatic muscle as well as the other muscles that support breathing.”
If shortness of breath is a limitation to your exercise routine, go slowly and exercise for as long as you can. “A long, slow workout will help increase your stamina, and your speed will increase with practice,” Clark explains. Using proper breathing techniques, like pursed-lip breathing and diaphragmatic breathing, can also help.
Remember that with any exercise program, it’s a smart idea to change your activities and intensity levels to prevent any one exercise from becoming dull or failing to safely challenge your cardiopulmonary system. Your muscles like mixing things up; change leads to increased strength, improved conditioning, and better balance, and it makes exercise more fun.
Result 25
Shake things up with a new, COPD-friendly exercise DVD or an online fitness program, or by working out with a home video game console like the Nintendo Wii Fit. If your budget allows, you might consider getting some at-home exercise equipment. “Elliptical machines, treadmills, and stationary bikes safely challenge the cardiopulmonary system and also deal with the loss of slow-twitch muscle fibers that occurs in people with COPD,” explains Gabriel Ettenson, a licensed physical therapist in Colorado. Ettenson also recommends whole-body vibration machines, which can be purchased for at-home use. “Not only is this safe for people with COPD,” he says, but a growing amount of research suggests that it's more effective than traditional exercise programs.” Other options are a fitness trampoline with a stability handlebar, or a simple resistance band.
If you already have equipment that you regularly work out with but your routine feels too easy, start incorporating the principles of interval training to mix it up. You might also enjoy changing up your at-home routine with some yoga, pranayama, tai chi, stair-climbing, and free weights. “Always practice pursed-lip and diaphragmatic breathing with these activities,” advises Michael Clark, BA, RRT, CPFT, from the John C. Lincoln Pulmonary Function Lab in Phoenix, Ariz. If shortness of breath is a limitation to your exercise routine in general, go slowly and exercise for as long as you can. “A long, slow workout will help increase your stamina,” explains Clark, “and your speed will increase with practice.”
Remember that with any exercise program, it’s a good idea to change your activities and intensity levels to prevent any one exercise from becoming dull. Your muscles like mixing things up; change leads to increased strength, improved conditioning, and better balance, and it makes exercise more fun.
Result 29
There are many COPD-friendly exercises you can do with a buddy, as long as you clear them with your doctor first. You and your partner can start a walking routine (or possibly light jogging) together. You can try cycling, gentle hiking, or swimming; take a yoga, pranayama, or fitness class together; or simply keep each other company while you work out at the gym. And remember, some activities are especially fun with a buddy, such as dancing or fencing lessons, or giving golf a try.
“Be sure to practice proper breathing techniques, and remind your friend to breath properly as well,” says Michael Clark, BA, RRT, CPFT, from the John C. Lincoln Pulmonary Function Lab in Phoenix, Ariz. “Everyone should use proper breathing, not just people with COPD. If you or your friend don’t have enough air to talk when you're walking or biking, slow down and purse those lips until your breathing improves.”
If shortness of breath is a limitation to your exercise routine generally, go slowly and exercise for as long as you can, suggests Clark. “A long, slow workout will help increase your stamina,” he says, “and your speed will increase with practice.”
With any exercise program, changing up your activities and intensity levels can prevent any one exercise from becoming dull or failing to safely challenge your cardiopulmonary system. Remember, your muscles like mixing up activities; change leads to increased strength, improved conditioning, and better balance, and it makes exercise more fun.
Result 31
Having the guidance and support of a personal trainer who understands the challenges of COPD can be a real motivator when it comes to staying fit, improving your cardiopulmonary function, and keeping your routine interesting. Not only can your personal trainer help you modify exercises you enjoy, but he or she can introduce you to new exercises and fitness ideas to help you get the most satisfaction from your COPD fitness routine. Gabriel Ettenson, a licensed physical therapist in Colorado, explains how important it is for personal trainers to help people with COPD find exercises that are enjoyable for them, especially if their COPD is advanced and they're fearful of exercise. “I think it is vital,” he says, “regardless of whether you're a physical therapist or a personal trainer, to find out about the person's interests and then try and recommend activities that work with that.” A personal trainer may recommend that you challenge yourself with new movements or exercise options in an environment you enjoy, whether that’s indoors, outdoors, at home, at a gym, or at a dance or yoga studio.
“Whatever the activity, start slowly and build intensity based on tolerance to any limitations, like breathing,” advises Michael Clark, BA, RRT, CPFT, from the John C. Lincoln Pulmonary Function Lab in Phoenix, Ariz. Clark also recommends that you ask your personal trainer about the dyspnea (shortness of breath) scale. “Don’t let your breathing get any harder than a ‘moderate dyspnea,’” he says. “Using proper breathing techniques, like pursed-lip breathing and diaphragmatic breathing, can help, so purse those lips together, pace your breathing, and don’t hold your breath.”
Result 33
Working with a physical therapist who has experience with COPD is a smart choice. A physical therapist can customize an exercise regimen for your fitness level and physical ability, including any breathing limitations, and switch it up for you when the routine starts feeling too routine. A physical therapist can also coach you in pursed-lip and diaphragmatic breathing techniques, as necessary, and help you with motivation when it comes to staying fit and improving your conditioning. Gabriel Ettenson, a licensed physical therapist in Colorado, explains how important it is in his line of work to help people with COPD find exercises that are enjoyable for them, especially if their COPD is advanced. “I think it is vital,” he says, “regardless of whether you are a physical therapist or a personal trainer, to find out about the person's interests, and then try and recommend activities that work with that.” A physical therapist might recommend that you challenge yourself with new movements or exercise options in an environment you enjoy, whether that’s indoors, outdoors, at home, at a gym, or at a dance or yoga studio.
Result 37
These days, gyms offer lots of different classes that can be fun for people with COPD, as long as their doctors approve. Check out the offerings at your local gym and consider taking a yoga, pranayama (focused breathing), tai chi, or Pilates class to improve your breathing and conditioning and strengthen your core, or a Zumba or spinning class for a good cardio workout. If your gym has a pool, check out the water aerobics schedule too. With any program, it’s a good idea to regularly change your activities and intensity levels to prevent any one exercise from becoming dull or failing to safely challenge your cardiopulmonary system. Remember, your muscles like mixing up activities; change leads to increased strength, improved conditioning, and better balance, and it makes exercise more fun.
If shortness of breath is a limitation to your exercise routine generally, go slowly and exercise for as long as you can. “A long, slow workout will help increase your stamina, and your speed will increase with practice,” says Michael Clark, BA, RRT, CPFT, from the John C. Lincoln Pulmonary Function Lab in Phoenix, Ariz. Using proper breathing techniques, like pursed-lip breathing and diaphragmatic breathing, can also help.
Result 39
If your doctor says it's okay, look for classes beyond the gym — at yoga, Pilates, Gyrotonic, dance, and martial arts studios. See if you can find a pranayama (focused breathing) class or a gentle and restorative yoga class, a beginner Zumba class, fencing lessons, tai chi lessons, or even a class in belly dancing. Remember that with any program, it’s a good idea to regularly change your activities and intensity levels to prevent any one exercise from becoming dull or failing to safely challenge your cardiopulmonary system. Your muscles like mixing up activities; change leads to increased strength, improved conditioning, and better balance, and it makes exercise more fun.
If shortness of breath is a limitation to your exercise routine generally, go slowly and exercise for as long as you can. “A long, slow workout will help increase your stamina, and your speed will increase with practice,” says Michael Clark, BA, RRT, CPFT, from the John C. Lincoln Pulmonary Function Lab in Phoenix, Ariz. Using proper breathing techniques, like pursed-lip breathing and diaphragmatic breathing, can also help.
Result 41
More and more fitness classes are being taught outdoors these days. Depending on the time of year and the climate where you live, you may be able to find outdoor yoga or Pilates classes, aerial dancing, or tai chi. Look for a walking or cycling group, an outdoor pool with aquatics classes, or tennis or golf lessons, if your doctor approves. Remember that with any program, it’s a good idea to regularly change your activities and intensity levels to prevent any one exercise from becoming dull or failing to safely challenge your cardiopulmonary system. Your muscles like mixing up activities; change leads to increased strength, improved conditioning, and better balance, and it makes exercise more fun.
If shortness of breath is a limitation to your exercise routine generally, go slowly and exercise for as long as you can. “A long, slow workout will help increase your stamina, and your speed will increase with practice,” says Michael Clark, BA, RRT, CPFT, from the John C. Lincoln Pulmonary Function Lab in Phoenix, Ariz.





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Date: 15.12.2018, 08:00 / Views: 33583